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University of Virginia

This class examines the challenges of African American historical research given the biases of archives and collecting and uses digital collection strategies and often digital mapping in an effort to develop a more complete picture.

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This course is a graduate-level introduction to the history, theory, and methods of the digital humanities.  It is also a required course for the graduate certificate in digital humanities.  In it, we will cover a range of historical, disciplinary, technical, and contemporary issues in digital humanities.  It is focused on digital humanities in the context of literature and language, but it also considers more general cultural and epistemological issues, as well as pragmatics, such as how maps and other spatial and temporal perspectives are enabled by the digital.  This course is also...

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Application of unsupervised machine learning methods to the linguistic, cultural, and sociological analysis of long form textual sources. Students will engage with DH theory, history, and methods, as well as large digitized text libraries, structured data (relational databases, linked data, etc.), and programming language. Knowledge of Python and familiarity with probability theory required.

T/TH 12:30-1:45

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This is an undergraduate course for English majors (and other students) that introduces the basics of computer programming, text analysis, text encoding, and statistics as experimental methodologies that promote new kinds of reading and interpretation. The aim is to move from “computation into criticism.” We’ll work, primarily, with a Shakespeare play, poetry by William Blake, and a Jane Austen novel. Students will find these works at the bookstore alongside manuals on Learning Unix and Text Analysis with R. No prior familiarity with coding or the language R required: we’ll be moving...

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Working with materials, tools, and data from Collective Biographies of Women (CBW), a Scholars’ Lab and IATH database project, we will branch out from the Jubilee volume of 1897: Women Novelists of Queen Victoria’s Reign, in which living women novelists write chapter-length biographical-critical notices of deceased novelists, excluding the Regency and earlier figures. A prevailing question in the course will be the force of identity- and periodization-politics, so to speak: the metadata categories that classify women writers of fiction (and their literary settings) who hale from various...

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This is the required course for the graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities. It entails participation in colloquia, sixty hours of experience participating in a research project uniting computation and humanities, and a portfolio.

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The antique past is a familiar point of reference for many artists and architects across time and place. Throughout western Europe and around the Mediterranean, the Roman past has been visible through archaeological remains, drawings, prints and texts although the use of the antique past in later art and architecture is often discussed exclusively with regard to what remains in Rome itself. Some, such as Hadrian’s Wall, has remained visible throughout time, while others such as Vindolanda have only been uncovered in the past century while still others, such as the Temple of Claudius...

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Check back soon for a summary of the course

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Tuesdays from 7:00pm - 9:30pm in Campbell Hall 158.

This is a course about information and data visualization. We live in a world rich with information. This course teaches visual and spatial thinking coupled with data analysis tools and custom web-enabled programming to construct and envision information. To find and even invent approaches toward seeing into complex problems, we will study, and make, useful, compelling and beautiful tools to see.

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Mondays from 1:00pm - 3:30pm in Campbell 108.

Digital tools have completely transformed the questions humanists ask, how they view the world and how they disseminate their scholarship. These new possibilities both open and close possible avenues of investigation. This course will introduce students to tools relevant to the analysis of visual culture and architecture as well as the process of how to learn to use digital tools – critical given the constantly changing array of options-  as well as how to develop a digital project. Together we will critically...

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