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DH@UVA, U.Va.
Your Portal to the Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia

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Would you like to see how instructors incorporate DH approaches into syllabi for courses taught across the humanistic disciplines?  Here you can search our exhaustive catalog of publicly available syllabi, pinpoint useful assignments, and identify tools and technologies to implement in your classroom.

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Course Summary:

Stay tuned for course description

Original Instructor: Allison Margaret Bigelow
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2018
discipline: Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese
Course Summary:

Stay tuned for course description

Original Instructor: Allison Margaret Bigelow
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2018
1
discipline: Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese
Course Summary:

Stay tuned for course description

Original Instructor: Allison Margaret Bigelow
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2018
2
discipline: Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese
Course Summary:

Tuesdays from 3:30pm - 6:00pm in New Cabell 068.

Some undergraduate course offerings can count toward your elective requirement, but that depends on the department and professor. If you'd like to take this course, contact the professor to see if they would allow you to take it and what they would require of your work in the course to ensure it counts at the graduate level.

Public History is history that is delivered to a popular audience of non-scholars, often at historic sites, museums, and, more recently, via digital tools and websites. This course will introduce students to the issues and goals that have shaped public history as a scholarly discipline, but the focus of the course will be on the contemporary practice of public history, with a focus on the public history of slavery.

Field trips to local sites and a final class project involving field work in several Reconstruction-era African American cemeteries are major components of this course. Readings, assignments, and tours of local historic sites will investigate the range of scholarly issues most relevant to the practice of public history today. Those include the challenges of presenting slavery as public history; enlarging the scope of historic sites to include the less powerful, especially women and enslaved workers; and ongoing debates about the difference between history and heritage. Who is the “public” in public history? Whose history gets told, and how? Throughout the semester, students will work closely with the librarians and curators at Special Collections; the GIS specialists in Scholars’ Lab; and community members from Buckingham County to research and present hidden or erased histories of African American life in the nineteenth century.

Tours of local historic sites and museum exhibits are a key element of this class. This semester, students will visit Monticello; Montpelier; take the African American History Tour of UVA led by the University Guide Service; and do a self-guided audio tour of the Daughters of Zion Cemetery in downtown Charlottesville. 

In  spring 2020 the final project will likely focus on the African American history of the Union Hill and Union Grove communities in Buckingham County. (If not Buckingham County, then we will do a similar project in Louisa County or Albemarle County.) We will do fieldwork in several cemeteries there, using ArcGIS technology to geolocate information about cemeteries, and the Story Map software to create layered digital narratives about people (living and dead), events, and places. We will also hold a community event in Buckingham County. You will present your final project, a Story Map, at the final class. 

Original Instructor: Lisa Goff
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2020
discipline: American Studies
Course Summary:

Wednesdays 3:30-6:00 p.m. in Fayerweather Hall 215

This seminar explores the development of Byzantine cities in relation to Byzantium’s political and socio- economic structures (4th-15thc). It aims at examining cities as lived spaces, investigating their architecture and topography as well as a range of urban experiences from mundane daily deeds to public processions. Emphasis will also be placed on the different social groups responsible for the transformation of Byzantine urban spaces.

Course aims:

Byzantine cities are our point of departure but what the seminar is really about is people, people living in Byzantine cities. The main aim of the course is learning to reconstruct lived experiences in the Byzantine city by studying architecture, urban planning and byzantine monuments. The development of critical thinking in reading scholarly works and in exploring ideas in written essays is also a key aspect of the course. Another objective is to compare and contrast experiences in the Byzantine city with our own urban lives and modern cities, thus the course includes visits around the city of Charlottesville and an informal discourse on ancient and modern cities.

Original Instructor: Fotini Kondyli
Taught at University of Virginia in Fall 2019
discipline: Architectural History
Course Summary:

This course is a graduate-level introduction to the history, theory, and methods of the digital humanities, and a required course for the new graduate certificate in digital humanities.  In it, we will cover a range of historical, disciplinary, technical and contemporary issues in digital humanities.  It is focused on digital humanities in the context of literature and language, but it also considers more general cultural and epistemological issues, as well as pragmatics, such as how maps and other spatial and temporal perspectives are enabled by the digital.  This course is also designed to introduce students to areas of digital humanities activity at UVa.  Students should come away from the course with a solid understanding of the origin of digital humanities, the kinds of work done under that label, the opportunities to participate in DH research at UVa, the research insights offered by digital humanities methods, and the applicability of those methods to the student’s own research interests.

Original Instructor: John M Unsworth
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2019
discipline: English, Digital Humanities
Course Summary:

Exploratory text analytics concerns the application of computational and statistical methods to the interpretation of large collections of digitized written documents. The field is motivated by the research of scholars from the humanities and human sciences interested in understanding the semantic, cultural, and social dimensions of texts from historical and contemporary sources, such as novels, newspapers, and social media. The course comprises three main sections: (1) an overview of text interpretation theory combined with information theory to introduce the domain knowledge required for making inferences in this area; (2) a hands-on introduction to methods for converting unstructured textual content into both graph and vector-space representations; and (3) the application and discussion of algorithms from natural language processing and text mining approaches, including term frequency measures, topic models, and sentiment analyses, to address the classic problems of text classification and clustering as well as new areas, such as social event detection, computational narratology, and data-driven approaches to structuralist poetics. There are no hard prerequisites for the course, but students should be comfortable with combining qualitative and quantitative approaches, have some experience programming in Python, and be familiar with basic statistics and probability theory.

Original Instructor: Rafael Alvarado
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2019
discipline: Data Science
conceptual difficulty: 4 technical difficulty: 4
Course Summary:

Thursdays 2:00-4:30 p.m. in New Cabell Hall 038

This workshop introduces advanced undergraduate and graduate students to a variety of methods and platforms for digital research featuring geospatial data.  Students will contribute to a series of common research projects as they learn geospatial visualization methods using using ArcMap, ArcGIS Online, Story Map, MapScholar, and VisualEyes.  We will read historical scholarship as well as primary sources with an eye firmly fixed on how to visualize spatial ideas and experiences and spend time debating the value of doing so.  We will also read about visualization more generally as we think creatively about how digital tools might enable us to make our own research more innovative and compelling.  This course counts as an elective for the Graduate Digital Humanities Certificate program.

 
Original Instructor: Max Edelson
Taught at University of Virginia in Fall 2019
discipline: History
Course Summary:

Increasingly, we access, share, and create information in digital forms, and this has been referred to as a digital revolution. But how does — or how should — this revolution in the way we teach, learn, and conduct research also change the way we do scholarly work in the classroom? The digital humanities investigates how new media and digital tools are changing the way we produce knowledge in the humanities, by enabling us to share not only information, but sound, visualizations, and even performances using new platforms. This class will provide an introduction to some of these formats and tools, along with immediate critical reflection and discussion about their value to the academy. Since information technology has become one of the key ways in which the peoples of the Caribbean and its diasporas both communicate with one another and gain access to global conversations, alongside this exploration of digital tools, in general, this class will likewise study how the internet can help people in marginalized spaces to engage with crucial social problems and to express their political ideals and aspirations. As the creators of the Digital Caribbean website have attested, “the Internet is analogous in important ways to the Caribbean itself as dynamic and fluid cultural space: it is generated from disparate places and by disparate peoples; it challenges fundamentally the geographical and physical barriers that disrupt or disallow connection; and it places others in relentless relation.” This class will therefore both introduce students to the digital humanities and to the Caribbean as an apt space for exploring the potential of the internet to confront and disrupt many of the more traditional structures of dominance that have traditionally silenced marginalized voices.

 
Original Instructor: Marlene L Daut
Taught at University of Virginia in Fall 2018
discipline: African-American and African Studies
Course Summary:

This is a new course that combines hands-on textual analysis with broader philosophical and cultural issues concerning the epistemology of data, the relations between the digital humanities and data science, and the tensions between traditional methods of the humanities and contemporary computational techniques. The course text is Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature by Matthew Jockers. The course is self-contained and is aimed at undergraduates in the humanities and social sciences who would like to acquire skills in these new areas. The course is restricted to third and fourth year students. We shall learn and use enough of the R programming language to write basic programs to analyze text. No previous knowledge of R is required but some familiarity with the basics of programming is expected, as is openness to discussions of interpretation. The class is interactive and you are expected to keep up with the assigned reading and exercises. Because discussing coding techniques with others is helpful, when possible, we shall pair students having a lower level of exposure to programming with students having a higher level. We hope this will benefit both students

Original Instructor: Paul Humphreys
Taught at University of Virginia in Fall 2017
discipline: Philosophy, Digital Humanities

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