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DH@UVA, U.Va.
Your Portal to the Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia

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Would you like to see how instructors incorporate DH approaches into syllabi for courses taught across the humanistic disciplines?  Here you can search our exhaustive catalog of publicly available syllabi, pinpoint useful assignments, and identify tools and technologies to implement in your classroom.

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Course Summary:
Taught at in Fall 2020
Course Summary:

This is the required course for the graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities. It entails participation in colloquia, sixty hours of experience participating in a research project uniting computation and humanities, and a portfolio.

Original Instructor: Alison Booth
Taught at in Spring 2020
Course Summary:

The antique past is a familiar point of reference for many artists and architects across time and place. Throughout western Europe and around the Mediterranean, the Roman past has been visible through archaeological remains, drawings, prints and texts although the use of the antique past in later art and architecture is often discussed exclusively with regard to what remains in Rome itself. Some, such as Hadrian’s Wall, has remained visible throughout time, while others such as Vindolanda have only been uncovered in the past century while still others, such as the Temple of Claudius provde the foundations for Colchester Castle. Stonework from over 20 individual monuments was embedded in Hexham Abbey and the Venerable Bede provides accounts of Roman remains in his 8th century History of the English People. This course will explore what was visible when throughout the region through a study of textual and visual evidence from the past with the aim of considering how more localized antique remains and their presentation may have influenced art and architectural production. Assigned readings will focus on the antique in England, with a particular interest in the medieval period but students will be free to develop research projects on any time period or place in relation to the classical past. This seminar is being offered in conjunction with a new digital humanities project which seeks to map information concerning the evidence for the antique past across time and place in Great Britain. The seminar will feature discussion of how to develop a digital humanities project using Design Thinking methodologies.

Requirements:

Class meetings will center on the discussion of related texts, websites, digital projects, short lectures and student presentations. Each student will be asked to give one major presentation (30 minutes) on a topic developed in conjunction with the instructor and develpp a digital project on the same topic using arcgis and Storymap. Several short assignments will also be given throughout the semester. .

Original Instructor: Lisa Reilly
Taught at University of Virginia in Fall 2020
discipline: Architectural History
Course Summary:

This course is a graduate-level introduction to the history, theory, and methods of the digital humanities.  It is also a required course for the graduate certificate in digital humanities.  In it, we will cover a range of historical, disciplinary, technical, and contemporary issues in digital humanities.  It is focused on digital humanities in the context of literature and language, but it also considers more general cultural and epistemological issues, as well as pragmatics, such as how maps and other spatial and temporal perspectives are enabled by the digital.  This course is also designed to introduce students to areas of digital humanities activity at UVa.  Students should come away from the course with a solid understanding of the origin of digital humanities, the kinds of work done under that label, the opportunities to participate in DH research at UVa, the research insights offered by digital humanities methods, and the applicability of those methods to the student’s own research interests.

Original Instructor: John Unsworth
Taught at in Spring 2020
Course Summary:

The antique past is a familiar point of reference for many artists and architects across time and place.  Throughout western Europe and around the Mediterranean, the Roman past has been visible through archaeological remains, drawings, prints and texts although the use of the antique past in later art and architecture is often discussed exclusively with regard to what remains in Rome itself. Some, such as Hadrian’s Wall, has remained visible throughout time, while others such as Vindolanda have only been uncovered in the past century while still others, such as the Temple of Claudius provide the foundations for Colchester Castle. Stonework from over 20 individual monuments was embedded in Hexham Abbey and the Venerable Bede provides accounts of Roman remains in his 8thcentury History of the English People. This course will explore what was visible when throughout the region through a study of textual and visual evidence from the past with the aim of considering how more localized antique remains and their presentation may have influenced art and architectural production. Assigned readings will focus on the antique in England, with a particular interest in the medieval period but students will be free to develop research projects on any time period or place in relation to the classical past.  This seminar is being offered in conjunction with a new digital humanities project which seeks to map information concerning the evidence for the antique past across time and place in Great Britain.

Original Instructor: Lisa Reilly
Taught at The University of Virginia in Spring 2019
Course Summary:

This course explores the nature of pre-modern sacred spaces, including sacred sites and landscapes as well as man-made structures, and the processes involved in their formation. While our case studies are primarily from the Mediterranean, we take a cross-cultural perspective to better appreciate how sacred spaces reflect both universal and culturally-specific characteristics. We focus on the study of sacred geography and the role of monumentality, performance and memory to explore how sacred spaces were conceptualized and experienced by different social groups. We also look at sacred spaces as places of violence, inequality and resistance and consider how such spaces could be politically charged. Our seminar will include visits in a variety of locations around Charlottesville including cemeteries, houses of faith, and our own UVA grounds to examine together how places acquire a religious identity and function, how they invite rituals and prescribed religious behaviors and how we come to perceive them as sacred spaces. During the semester we will also be visiting UVA’s Fralin Museum of Art and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection to further explore how objects and works or art participate in the making of sacred spaces and negotiate thecomplex relationship between the secular and sacred spheres.

Original Instructor: Fotini Kondyli
Taught at The University of Virginia in Fall 2019
Course Summary:

Check back soon for a summary of the course

Original Instructor: Siva Vaidhyanathan
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2020
discipline: Media Studies
Course Summary:

Tuesdays from 7:00pm - 9:30pm in Campbell Hall 158.

This is a course about information and data visualization. We live in a world rich with information. This course teaches visual and spatial thinking coupled with data analysis tools and custom web-enabled programming to construct and envision information. To find and even invent approaches toward seeing into complex problems, we will study, and make, useful, compelling and beautiful tools to see.

Original Instructor: Eric Field
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2020
discipline: Architectural History
Course Summary:

Mondays from 1:00pm - 3:30pm in Campbell 108.

Digital tools have completely transformed the questions humanists ask, how they view the world and how they disseminate their scholarship. These new possibilities both open and close possible avenues of investigation. This course will introduce students to tools relevant to the analysis of visual culture and architecture as well as the process of how to learn to use digital tools – critical given the constantly changing array of options-  as well as how to develop a digital project. Together we will critically assess the role of digital humanities in art and architectural history through an analysis of selected digital projects as well as specific tools.  We will consider questions such as: What are the tools that have made this work possible? How have these same tools imposed limits on the project under examination? How can these tools advance on our own work and the dissemination of our scholarship? We will analyze what  these tools make possible in terms of our own research and learn how to apply them. We will work through the process of digital project development from selecting objects of study, to recording those objects, constructing a database to visualizing the data and finally representing it through a digital project. These will include 3-d scanning visualization, GIS mapping tools, project management techniques, and data collection. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline.

Original Instructor: Lisa Reilly
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2020
discipline: Architectural History
Course Summary:

Mondays from 1:00pm - 3:30pm in Campbell 108.

Digital tools have completely transformed the questions humanists ask, how they view the world and how they disseminate their scholarship. These new possibilities both open and close possible avenues of investigation. This course will introduce students to tools relevant to the analysis of visual culture and architecture as well as the process of how to learn to use digital tools – critical given the constantly changing array of options-  as well as how to develop a digital project. Together we will critically assess the role of digital humanities in art and architectural history through an analysis of selected digital projects as well as specific tools.  We will consider questions such as: What are the tools that have made this work possible? How have these same tools imposed limits on the project under examination? How can these tools advance on our own work and the dissemination of our scholarship? We will analyze what  these tools make possible in terms of our own research and learn how to apply them. We will work through the process of digital project development from selecting objects of study, to recording those objects, constructing a database to visualizing the data and finally representing it through a digital project. These will include 3-d scanning visualization, GIS mapping tools, project management techniques, and data collection. This course is open to graduate students from any discipline.

Original Instructor: Lisa Reilly
Taught at University of Virginia in Spring 2020
1
discipline: Architectural History

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