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DH@UVA, U.Va.
Your Portal to the Digital Humanities at the University of Virginia

Meet the Certificate Students

Currently Enrolled Certificate Students

Shalmi Barman

Shalmi Barman is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Virginia, where she studies book history, bibliography, and 19th century print. Barman hopes to use her time in the DH Certificate program to develop skills in text analytics and mid-range reading and to learn about the conception, creation, and usage of platforms and tools for digital scholarly editions. 

Abigail Bradford

Abigail Bradford is a PhD student in the Program in Mediterranean Art and Archaeology at the McIntire Department of Art where she focuses on Greek vases and the transmission of Greek myth through artistic, oral, and musical traditions. Her disseration focuses on domestic music in Ancient Greece and representations of musical performance, particularly in weddings and scenes that center women. Bradford holds interests in linked open data and GIS.

 

John Calhoun

John Calhoun is a PhD student in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia, where they focus on political organizing in Reconstruction-era Louisiana. They are particularly interested in the maneuverings of freedpeople to secure fundamental political, social, and economic rights in the face of both social and geographic barriers. Calhoun hopes to use their time in the DH Certificate program to master geospatial visualization tools and digital mapping software like MapScholar

Malcolm Cammeron

Malcolm Cammeron is a PhD student in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia, where they focus on questions of race and urban space in the postbellum U.S. South. In particular, their research explores the interstices of urban renewal and redevelopment, public housing, labor, and the Black freedom struggle in Alabama. Cammeron hopes to use their time in the DH Certificate program to develop skills with geospatial tools to determine residential and commercial patterns and to document migration, blight, disease, socioeconomic phenomena, and crime in Gadsden, Alabama. 

Ren Capucao

Ren Capucao is a PhD student at the University of Virginia School of Nursing, where he focuses on the Filipino nurse diaspora in the United States. As a DH Certificate student, Capucao hopes to use GIS technologies to track Filipino nurses' migration patterns. He plans to incorporate other DH tools and methodologies to enhance and expand a traveling exhibition funded by Virginia Humanities entitled Culture to Care: The History of Filipino Nurses in Virginia.

 

Ankita Chakrabarti

Ankita Chakrabarti is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Virginia, where they focus on the contemporary novel under the supervision of Michael Levenson. Chakrabarti hopes to use their time in the DH Certificate program to develop skills with virtual and augmented reality technologies. 

Lucia Colombari

Lucia Colombari is a PhD student in the McIntire Department of Art, where she focuses on art history with interests in European and American 20th century art, with an emphasis on transatlantic exchanges and Italian modernism. Her dissertation explores the intersections of art and technology by investigating the cultural exchanges between Italian Futurism and modern art in the United States in the first decades of the twentieth century. Colombari hopes to use her time in the DH Certificate program to learn large-scale text analytic approaches. 

Emma Dove

Emma Dove is a Ph.D. student in the McIntire Department of Art, where she focuses on medieval art history. Her research interests include the histories of the book and of reading, female devotional praxis in the Middle Ages, and theories of body-object entanglement. Her dissertation project concerns the relationship between the material accoutrements of prayer, emphasizing devotional manuscripts, and the gendered self-fashioning of their users within the increasingly affective devotional context of the later Middle Ages. Dove hopes to use her time in the DH Certificate program to learn about digital preservation, and she is currently developing a database on digitized Books of Hours called "Digitized Devotion.

Evan Henry

Evan Henry is an MA student in the Department of English at the University of Virginia. Henry hopes to use his time in the DH Certificate program to learn topic modeling and other text analytical approaches to pursue DH projects related to his intellectual interests in disability and metaphor. 

Kerwin Holmes

 

Kerwin Holmes is a PhD student in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia, where he focuses on patristic theology and ancient Christian and Jewish thought. 

 

 

Yao Jiang

Yao Jiang is a graduate student in the Master of Architectural History program at the University of Virginia School of Architecture, where he focuses on landscapes studies. He hopes to use his time in the DH Certificate program to develop proficiency with ArcGIS StoryMaps and other spatial technologies that will facilitate research related to what are called the plant humanities. 

 

 

Kaylee Lamb

Kaylee Lamb is a graduate student in the MA in English with a Concentration in Teaching Literature and Writing program in the Department of English at the University of Virginia. Lamb hopes to use their time in the DH Certificate program to advance their interests in digital pedagogy, digital scholarly editions, and large-scale text analytics. They are currently a research assistant for Alison Booth working on Booth's Collective Biographies of Women.

Emily Mellen

Emily Mellen is a PhD Student in the McIntire Department of Music at the University of Virginia, where she holds research interests in music and sound in the Arab world, music & politics, music & altered states of consciousness, ethnography, timbre, voice studies, women in music, and global pop. Her disseration focuses on voice, technology, and storytelling colonial and postcolonial North Africa. Mellen hopes to use her time in the DH Certificate to explore postcolonial DH theory and sound studies in addition to developing an archive building skillset that includes knowledge of databases and scholarly management systems. 

 

Allison Mitchell

Allison Mitchell is a PhD student in the Corcoran Department of History where they focus on 20th century U.S. history, African American history, Southern history, and digital humanities. Their research examines local election and voting rights activism in Florida from 1940 to the present. Mitchell hopes to use their time in the DH Certificate program to develop proficiency with geospatial technologies including MapScholar, ArchGIS, and VisualEyes

Charity Revutin

Charity Revutin is an MArH student at the University of Virginia School of Architecture where they hold an interest in digital heritage and architectural history. Revutin was a Cultural Heritage Informatics intern at the Scholars' Lab in fall 2018. 

Nicholas Scott

Nicholas Scott is a PhD student in the Corcoran Department of History at the University of Virginia. Their disseration focuses on the history of the Chilean working class from 1958 to 2000 with an emphasis on the relationship between urban space and political possibility. Scott hopes to use their time in the DH Certificate program to develop GIS, AR, and data visualization skills. 

Mikki Stacey

Mikki Stacey is an MA student in the Department of English at the University of Virginia, where she focuses on the personal writings of Victorian women and scholarly digital editing. Stacey is currently a research assistant for Alison Booth working on Booth's Collective Biographies of Women.

 

 

Lloyd Sy

Lloyd Sy is a PhD student in the Department of English at the University of Virginia, where he focuses on 19th century American literature. Sy currently serves as project manager for Alison Booth's Collective Biographies of Women. He was also a graduate student assistant working on For Better For Verse, an interactive digital platform intended to teach users prosody, spearheaded by Herbert "Chip" Tucker, the John C. Coleman Professor of English at the University of Virginia. 

Aaron Thompson

Aaron Thompson is a PhD student in the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at the University of Virginia, where he takes an interdisciplinary approach to study how Russian literature from 1850-1950 created, supported, and deconstructed ideology, especially ideologies of religious institutions. Thompson hopes to use his time in the DH Certificate program to learn large-scale text analytic approaches. 

Zaina Ujayli

Zaina Ujayli is an MA student in the Department of English at the University of Virginia, where she focuses on postcolonial literature in the Middle East and North Africa. Ujayli has participated in DH practicum work with Professors Alison Booth and Tamika Carey, both of the Department of English.

 

 

 

Hannah Wolfe

Hannah Wolfe is an MA student at the University of Virginia School of Architecture, where she serves as a research assistant to Sheila Crane, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Architectural History. Wolfe served as a laser scanning intern at the Scholars' Lab during the 2019-2020 academic year. 

 

Students and UVA Alumni With Completed Certificates

2021

Catherine Addington

Catherine Addington is a PhD student in the Spanish Department, where she studies the cultural production of Catholic religious orders. Her DH work focuses on remediated editions and digital pedagogy. As a fellow in the Scholars’ Lab’s Praxis Fellows program, Addington was a co-PI for Unclosure, a public humanities project exploring the public domain. She was also a collaborator on Multepal, a thematic research collection surrounding the K’iche’ cultural narrative known as the Popol Wuj. In addition, Addington developed a critical edition of a missionary friar’s prologue to an ethnographic work on the K’iche’ Maya.  She expects to receive her doctorate in May 2021. 

Link to Addington's DH Portfolio page

 

2020

Justin Greenlee

Justin Greenlee earned his PhD in Art History from the University of Virginia, where he concentrated on topics involving art and cultural interchange between Italy and Byzantium. As a 2016-2017 Praxis Fellow at the Scholars’ Lab, Greenlee was a co-collaborator for DASH-Amerikan, a digital humanities project that used web scraping and topic modeling of the Kardashian family's Twitter feeds, closed captioning from the reality TV show Keeping Up with the Kardashians, and the content of Us Weekly articles to explore the sometimes-competing constructions of femininity, ethnicity, and cultural power in the social media ecologies of the family. He also contributed to Dorothy Wong’s digital project Silk Road: The Path of Transmission of Avalokiteśvara, constructing an Adobe XD wireframe for a prospective public user interface. Greenlee was a founder of the Monuments Working Group which utilized archived Twitter threads, Adobe Spark presentations, and collections of images and textual sources to educate the public and promote advocacy around commemorative landscapes in Charlottesville and Richmond. He defended his dissertation in April 2020 and graduated May 2020. 

Link to Greenlee's DH Portfolio page

Maayan Ornath

Maayan Ornath is a graduate student in the MA in English with a Concentration in Teaching Literature and Writing program in the Department of English at the University of Virginia. She holds interests in digital pedagogy and transnational literature. Ornath has used her time in the DH Certificate program to develop a DH pedagogical skillset that includes virtual reality, 3D printing, and digital video production. With inspiration from John Unsworth's "Introduction to Digital Humanities" course, she wrote a proposal for an ACLS Digital Extension Grant in support of a project called "Renaissance Actors Database." This complementary database proposes to extend and enrich an existing digital edition of Thomas Middleton's "A Game at Chess." Ornath expects to graduate in May 2020. 

Link to Ornath's DH Portfolio page

 

2019

Christian Howard-Sukhil

Christian Howard-Sukhil earned her PhD in English literature from the University of Virginia in 2019 and is the first UVA graduate student to receive the DH Graduate Certificate. Since April 2019, she has been the Digital Humanities Post-Doctoral Fellow at Bucknell University. Prior to her role at Bucknell, Howard-Sukhil contributed to a number of DH projects and initiatives at UVA. As research assistant to Alison Booth, Academic Director of the Scholars' Lab and Professor of English at the University of Virginia, Howard-Sukhil used TEI to record narrative events in Booth's investigation of group biographies of women in a project known as Collective Biographies of Women. As a 2017-2018 Praxis Fellow, Howard-Sukhil, in collaboration with her cohort, developed UVA Reveal, an augmented reality app that facilitates the exploration of hidden spaces and histories at the University of Virginia. From 2018 to 2019, she served as the project manager for the DH@UVA Curriculum Development Team.

Link to Howard-Sukhil's DH Portfolio page